sprinting

Just a Dumb Coach

Jodie Williams is smarter than me.   As hard as it is for me to admit that, it is true.   Anaso Jobodwana is also smarter than me.  So is Lolo Jones.  And Kaillie Humphries.  And Ameer Webb.  Andre De Grasse.  Steve Mesler.  Christian Malcolm.  Glenn Smith.  And a few hundred other folk who have had the (dis?)pleasure of my...

Stop Dragging Your Toes: Part VI

Welcome back to the final part of this series on the ‘toe-drag phenomenon’.   Thanks for sticking with me here! What was supposed to be just a short post on this somewhat controversial topic, has ended up being a six-parter - which honestly, could go on forever!  I tried writing this succinctly, but the reality is that much of what I...

Stop Dragging Your Toes: Part V

In part IV, I discussed the general framework by which we go about designing our input (in this specific case, the ‘technical’ input of block clearance and early acceleration).  In part V, I’d like to take it a step further, and discuss how we do this in practice - i.e. what are the next steps in determining how each athlete...

Stop Dragging your Toes: Part IV

Thanks for sticking with me.   What started as a short post on the toe-drag silliness, has somehow taken on a life of its own, and is now going on 10,000 words.  Apologies - but I really think the context is required here; to unpack this properly, we need to peel back a few layers.   And don’t worry - we are...

Stop Dragging Your Toes: part III

At the end of part II, I asked the question:  “Is the goal for the athlete to drag her toe, or is it for her to have an effective and efficient block clearance and initial acceleration”? Hopefully, we can all agree that the goal is to be effective and efficient.  So that said, before moving forward to describing the process...

Stop Dragging your Toes: part II

Thanks for coming back.   In part I, I offered my thoughts on why the ‘toe-drag’ is not the be-all / end-all it is often made out to be, and in fact, a practice I would discourage in almost all instances. To promote  ‘low heel recovery’ is often offered as the reason why coaches instruct athletes to drag their toes -...

Stop Dragging Your Toes!

Over the last 15 years or so, there has been a debate in the track and field world around the recovery height of the heels during early acceleration in sprinting.  We actually don’t obsess over ‘low recovery of heel’ in the initial steps, but we understand why many do.   Many of the world’s top sprinters’ heel recovery is so low...

Polarization Of Intensity

This short excerpt is from Module 4; Section 6 of the Foundation Course, entitled ‘Loading Methods’. Module 4 is an awesome Module, written primarily by our friends Derek Evely and PJ Vazel. This section includes an introduction to polarized training - an increasingly topical subject over the last few years, as well as a few case-studies, describing its use with...

Life as a Competition

"How can we apply this understanding of the increased motivation and drive experienced through competition, and harness it into increased performance? And how do we do this specifically within an individual sport such as track & field? While lining athletes up next to each other for sprints and drills is an option, it is not always the best option from...

From High School, to High Performance: Sprinting Tips for the Development Coach

The majority of coaches can tell you that training high school and elite athletes should be different, but what does this look like in application? How do you as a coach adjust the details of your training to provide an environment that allows your athletes to develop the abilities that elites execute so well? ALTIS World long sprints coach Mike...
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